DIY Hanging Planters

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I love making one-of-a-kind gifts for my friends and family every holiday season, but if you’re like me, it’s hard to find the time to craft something completely from scratch. That’s why I love being able to repurpose thrifted goods into something that is useful and beautiful without it taking weeks to make. The hanging planters we’ll be putting together today, for example, take only a couple of hours to complete! At this rate, you’ll have everyone crossed off of your to-gift list before the first candle of Hanukkah is lit!

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Here’s what you’ll need to craft your own hanging planters:

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Supplies

  • Thrifted ceramic jars (or adjust the project for tins or glassware)
  • Thrifted belt
  • Drill
  • Ceramic tile drill bit
  • Painter’s tape
  • 4 screws that fit properly into the drilled hole
  • 4 coordinating washers
  • 4 coordinating nuts
  • 1 nail
  • Small hammer
  • Scissors
  • Pen or pencil
  • Measuring tool (a sewing tape measure works perfectly)
  • 2 plants
  • Hooks/hardware to hang the planters (if the planters won’t be hung in a stud, make sure you include wall anchors)
  • Safety mask
  • Safety goggles
  • Small piece of scrap wood

 

Step 1: After washing your thrifted ceramics, plan the placement of the holes. You’ll need two on each planter. Put a bit of painter’s tape over those areas and mark where you want the holes to be. The tape keeps the drill bit from skidding across the glaze as well as protecting the surface from small cracks the drilling could cause.

Step 2: Gently set a nail on each mark and tap it a tiny bit (so carefully) just to dent the glaze. This creates a starting point for the drill bit to bite into.

Step 3: You may want to take this one outside as there will be some dust. With your safety equipment on, carefully drill all four of your holes. If the dust is clogging up the hole, try sucking it out with a vacuum or wiping it with a damp cloth or Q-tip.

Step 4: Remove the tape and wipe the planters down. You may even want to rinse and dry them if there’s a lot of dust inside.

Step 5: Measure and cut the length you’ll need for your belt straps. Mine are each 13” long. After cutting them to size, I rounded all four ends of the straps.

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Step 6: Decide where the holes in your straps should be then mark all four of those. Place the straps, one end at a time, on the scrap wood and hammer the nail through to punch a hole. You may need to wiggle this around quite a bit to stretch it so the screw will fit through.

Step 7: Thread the screws through the straps and planters one at a time, securing them from the inside with the washer then nut. Tighten as best you can then all you need to do is add greenery!

Dangling plants like burro’s tail or ivy would look amazing in here, but to keep things festive I decided to start with clippings from my Christmas tree. This way plants can be swapped out seasonally, by style preference, or to best suit the light wherever my pal decides to install her planters. You may want to include hanging hardware with your gift to make it even easier to put up.

Photo12.jpgIf you wanted to, you could also include a note which shares the source of your supplies along with Goodwill’s mission: to generate opportunities for people to build brighter futures for themselves and their families. This way, the person who receives your gift knows that these are so much more than just planters. When you holiday shop at Goodwill stores, your gifts just keep on giving, and I can’t think of anything merrier than that.

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Brass to class

By Rachael Crevier, Internet Marketing and Event Coordinator

lamp makeover (1)

I’ll admit it. I’m extremely impatient and it often bites me in the butt. I will explain in a moment.

Sometimes I just get a “feeling” that I have to go Goodwill shopping. If you’re an avid thrift shopper you know what I’m talking about.

That’s how I SCORED this perfect set of lamps for a DIY makeover! I popped into the Roosevelt Park store in Muskegon and lo and behold, I was in the right place at the right time. I found these heavy-duty brass lamps for $6 each! I wasn’t in love with the color, even though brass is trendy again, but I loved the price and the quality.

So I took them home, wiped them down a little bit, removed the price tag and covered the light socket with a plastic bag and masking tape.

I laid out some plastic in the yard and went to town with my Black Satin Rust-Oleum spray paint. The color was great but it wasn’t covering very well as I hope. The rounded section in the middle of the lamp was a little spotty. So I let that layer dry and searched through Pinterest for some clarity. Like I said in the beginning, I’m extremely impatient and I was just so excited I didn’t even think to use a primer first. This is where I went wrong. SO to all you thrift shoppers out there, MAKE SURE YOU USE A PRIMER FIRST. If you want step-by-step instructions and pictures on how to spray paint a brass lamp, check out Jennifer Stagg’s blog withHeart she’s got it all laid out for you! I was too impatient which resulted in me doing multiple coats to achieve the desired look.

Even without using a primer the lamps turned out wonderful! I found two matching shades to complete the look at the Whitehall Goodwill. I can’t even believe how lucky I got, matching lamps and shades!

They really helped tie together all our décor. I love finding high-quality, low prices items for my home. Half the fun is finding the item and the other half is transforming it into something that really complements your style.